2015 – June – Dedridge

Messing around with long exposures at the local pond.
The weir is in full flow with both flood routes active beside the 3 main sluices, leading to a horse-shoe shape of white water.
These shots were taken in the evening. When I returned in the morning with the dog, the weir was back to it’s normal trickle

Under the Bridge
Under the Bridge
Beside the Bridge
Beside the Bridge
The Monarch at Sunset
The Monarch at Sunset

2015 – June – The Craig and Niddry Castle

Simon and I went up Binney Craig.
I’ve lived here for about 10 years and I’ve never been there before – in fact, I didn’t even know how to get there.

For those not in the area, it’s a volcanic outcrop and local legend has it being one of the four rocky tumescence formed when the Edinburgh volcano erupted. These outcrops are supposed to follow (roughly) the points of the compass.

Doing what we do so you don't have to
Doing what we do so you don’t have to
Binney Craig
Binney Craig 

Niddry Castle is a private dwelling in West Lothian. It’s spent most of the time that I’ve been here under scaffolding during it’s refurbishment.

We’d left the Craig and was just looking for something else to do (we can be so good at planning) and stumbled across the castle.
This is shot just after sundown and has no additional illumination

Evening Castle
Evening Castle

2015 – May – Street Photography

Simon and I went to Glasgow for a bit of urban street photography.
(We also bumped in to and assisted a friend who was having a shoot in the park that we were in … and none of us knew that the other party was going to be there, in that city, on that day, at that time. Spooky)

Being us, we don’t really do traditional street stuff, so here’s my take …

2015 – May – Focus Stacking

Focus stacking is used when ever you want … but mainly when you have an object that goes outside of the depth of field and you want to get the whole object in focus.
Normally, you can do this by increasing the length of time that the shutter is open for, and by changing the f-stop, although this isn’t always a sure fire way to get a result as the shutter being open for longer means more chance of over-exposure.
Focus stacking reduces this risk as it allows you to set the correct exposure throughout the stack images, as you only have to expose for the bit you are shooting.
It’s great for shooting macro – where you normally have a shallow depth of field – but can also be used on landscape to ensure a truly front to back sharp image.

Focus Stacked Garlic
Focus Stacked Garlic

2015 – May – At the Church

Simon and I went out for a couple of hours to a few churches in the area. Unfortunately, all bar one of them were locked.

It did however give me a chance to shoot a few images with a view to testing the new merge to HDR feature in Lightroom …

Abercorn Church
Abercorn Church

This is a HDR image made up of several individual frames shot at different settings and merged together as a HDR image. The different settings allow for an underexposed, a perfectly exposed and an overexposed images (or however you want to do it) to be merged and so the resultant image features the best of each individual frame

2015 – May – Macro Flowers

I’ve downloaded a bit of software for my phone called Slingshot (www.brainylantern.com) that enables me to control the Canon 7d through my phone as if tethered to a computer. This gives me full control over the camera without having to be near it, as I can view it all on the screen of my Android device.
It can be pretty handy, especially when used on a 7″ or above tablet for checking focus on small objects as you can enlarge them on a bigger screen.

Anyway, I wanted to test the software, so off I went in to the woods; I don’t have a macro lens yet, so these were shot using an old MD fit manual lens, a MD to MA adapter and a Sony to Canon adapter.

Flowers in the woods
Flowers in the woods
Flowers in the woods
Flowers in the woods

2015 – May – UrbEx

I don’t do a lot of Urban Exploration (Urbex) but when I do, I like to find the crappiest, wettest, rainiest day possible …

Simon and I went exploring and came across this place and we had a good look around it. There are plenty of rooms within the complex, but not all of them are interesting or big enough to photograph. Some of them are just too bloody dangerous.

All images are shot using the available light and at ISO2000 and f4. Shutter speeds vary between .50 and .20 seconds and all were hand-held. [Image stabilisation certainly seems to be better on the Canon than the Sony’s that I’m used to]

It wasn’t the best of conditions to shoot this place in; it was raining and the available light was a tad flat … but as we were there, it would have been rude not to have done so.

2015 – April – The Chemical Works

Grangemouth is a massive, sprawling petro-chemical plant in central Scotland.
Different sections of it produce different products, ranging from fuel to polyethylene. When in full flow, the steam from the cooling towers and light from the flare stacks can be seen for miles.

It has a futuristic skyline, born out of requirement, and it wouldn’t look out if place in Bladerunner …