September 2015 – Kat Folan

Simon and I decided that we would travel North for a change.

A casting was produced, and from the respondents, the wonderful Kat Folan was chosen.
This was primarily a research and testing mission, and as Simon and I have very little knowledge of “The North”, Kat was our guide.

Our favourite spot was the fantastic Slains Castle, somewhere north of Aberdeen.

2015 – July – Lanarkshire

Yeah, I know … it’s a bit out of synch – July then August and then July.

It’s what happens when you think that you’ve done something and in reality you haven’t.
I thought that I’d already posted these images, but on cursory glance through the blog, I haven’t.

Anyway, Simon and I escaped for a day (and part of the night) in to deepest darkest Lanarkshire … we even crossed a county border in to somewhere else, although I’m not sure where.

 

2015 – August – The Devils Pulpit

I’d seen photos of a gorge near Loch Lomond called The Devils Pulpit and decided I wanted to go and have a look at it.

Simon, Linda and I jumped in the car and headed off to the deepest darkest depths of Finnich Glen near Drymen.

When we got there, there was a couple walking around and looking lost. The bag gave the chap away as either a fisherman, or photographer; the presence of the female made the fisherman unlikely so that left photographer. It turned out that they were from Spain originally, but were living in Winchburgh (just around the corner from here) as they found the Spanish climate disagreeable. So they moved to Scotland ….

Anyway, the 5 of us strolled around for a bit, and eventually found the gorge – you’ld be surprised at how cunningly disguised a 100 odd foot hole in the ground can be – but couldn’t work out how to get down to the bottom.

Help arrived in the form of a returning group, who rather nicely gave us (correct) directions

There are some pretty steep and worn steps leading down to the central chamber, so be careful if you go. I didn’t shoot these as I wanted to get something different than most of the shots I’d seen, so off came the boots and on went the waders …

2015 – July – Thornton Fever Hospital

 

And no one called us to the land
And no one knows the where’s or why’s.
Something stirs and something tries
Starts to climb toward the light.

Echoes
Echoes

Simon came round last night and on the spur of the moment, we went up to the old Fever Hospital at Thornton. We’d previously visited the site in May and while there discussed the shoot potential of the site.
It’s popularity as a location seems to be growing amongst photographers in this neck of the woods, even with people bringing their own props – and leaving them there – as well as models.
Last nights visit was a spur of the moment thing, and after wading through soaking wet nettles, grass and thistles (rain seems to be a predominant feature of us visiting this site as it was tipping it down last time too) we went for a wander around in the fast fading light

Simon did his bit, go his shot, and then I did my thing. We always try to do different things when out together, with varying degrees of success, and sometimes we do use bits of each others setups. In this case, the prop was already there (it wasn’t there in May).

 

 

 

2015 – June – The Craig and Niddry Castle

Simon and I went up Binney Craig.
I’ve lived here for about 10 years and I’ve never been there before – in fact, I didn’t even know how to get there.

For those not in the area, it’s a volcanic outcrop and local legend has it being one of the four rocky tumescence formed when the Edinburgh volcano erupted. These outcrops are supposed to follow (roughly) the points of the compass.

Doing what we do so you don't have to
Doing what we do so you don’t have to
Binney Craig
Binney Craig 

Niddry Castle is a private dwelling in West Lothian. It’s spent most of the time that I’ve been here under scaffolding during it’s refurbishment.

We’d left the Craig and was just looking for something else to do (we can be so good at planning) and stumbled across the castle.
This is shot just after sundown and has no additional illumination

Evening Castle
Evening Castle

2015 – May – UrbEx

I don’t do a lot of Urban Exploration (Urbex) but when I do, I like to find the crappiest, wettest, rainiest day possible …

Simon and I went exploring and came across this place and we had a good look around it. There are plenty of rooms within the complex, but not all of them are interesting or big enough to photograph. Some of them are just too bloody dangerous.

All images are shot using the available light and at ISO2000 and f4. Shutter speeds vary between .50 and .20 seconds and all were hand-held. [Image stabilisation certainly seems to be better on the Canon than the Sony’s that I’m used to]

It wasn’t the best of conditions to shoot this place in; it was raining and the available light was a tad flat … but as we were there, it would have been rude not to have done so.

2015 February – re-discovering and NSFW

I cant help revisiting this shoot with Chrissy last year.
Every shoot with Chrissy is an enjoyable and productive experience.

There’s still plenty more to give from this shoot, and I’m slowly working my way through it.

Follow Me
Follow Me
Wind farm
Prone
I was going to call this “Scottish Sunbathing”, but as its not raining, I don’t think I can
Remembering Heather
Remembering Heather

 

This is also the first time I’ve used my old, re-vamped desktop to edit (and the first time I’ve been able to use Silver Efex as it won’t run on my laptop. Must need RAM on then graphics card or something); more than happy with the hardware, jury is out on the software.

 

2015 – February – Night time … The SuperLight Highway

Simon and I went out to a local woods in the dark  to mess around a bit.

OK, let me re-phrase that in a slightly less innuendo kinda way.

Simon and I grabbed our camera kit and went off in to a local woods for a bit of night-time experimentation using a couple of lighting rigs I had lovingly fashioned out of bits and bobs and loads of sticky tape (I got mine before the rush to B&Q following the release of a certain film).

There was plenty of atmospherics about – low grey cloud reflecting the street lights and a mist / fog that was thick enough to be a pain, but not thick enough to be useful – with it being a really moist night.

We parked up – for once not in the local dogging hotspot -, grabbed our kit and off we jolly well went.

After a bit of the normal fannying about the photographers do in the dark we eventually came upon a plan, and set forth realising the dream.

This is my final image, and Simon’s image can be found by clicking here

SuperLight Highway
SuperLight Highway

 

 

How the Superlight Highway was made

The Superlight Highway is a composite image of 5 different shots taken with the camera on a tripod and not moved during each shot.

Composite images tend to work better if you have an idea in mind – this means that all the component parts will drop together in the frame without any major issues.

Simon and I were essentially shooting the same shot, but if you look at Simon’s you’ll see he has a different image, caused by locating his camera in a different place to mine. This means that we can share each others lighting ideas and methodologies, but we get different images.

So, I’ve shot my images, banged them in to Lightroom (keyworded them as I’m getting better at using LR) now what?

I’m not the worlds best post-processor, far from it, and there are many different ways to do the same thing – and what I like someone else may not. I’m not telling you what you should do; I’m saying what did.

I opened the base layer in Photoshop as a smart object:

Blue and red - base layer
Blue and Red – Base Layer

The I opened the smart object in Adobe Camera RAW

Opened in ACR
Opened in ACR

and messed around a bit with the colour sliders as I didn’t want all the same colours

Then I opened the middle section in to Photoshop, which I left in the original blue colour

The Blue Layer - as shot
The Blue Layer – as shot

This was then Select All > Copy and Pasted as new layer above the Base layer
I then messed around with the blending options until I found the one I liked the best

I mucked around with the final layer to get the colour that I wanted,

This was Dark Blue too
This was Dark Blue too

and then added that as a layer above the other two, and once again, mucked around with the blending options until I found the one I wanted.

That just left me with 4 bars of colour, and a black(ish) background with loads of light bleed.

So … say hello to Halogen …

Halogen makes it's appearance
Halogen makes it’s appearance

This was added to the layers and the blend mode changed … again to one that I liked

I was then left with an image that was a bit too light, so introducing …. CREE LED …

Star of the background, it's CREE LED
Star of the background, it’s CREE LED

Again, this was added to the top of the stack and the blending mode played with a bit.

I played around with the opacity of both the Halogen and CREE LED layers after the blending modes to try to get the right balance between the two colours of light and the shadows …

The finished Photoshop stack looks like this:

Taa Daa ...
Taa Daa …

You can see that a layer mask has been added to the Dark Blue layer … this was because there is a lot of light bleed in the dark blue, which I believe is due to the moisture in the air. I just tided it up a bit by painting the layer below through.
I also added a Brightness Contrast layer, and upped the contrast a touch.

Compositing an image doesn’t need to be hard work – there is very little brush work here, it’s all just messing around with blending modes and opacities.

Easy peasy, lemon squeezy.

2014 – November – Bangour Hospital Village

Bangour Hospital Village is a massive sprawling site just outside of Livingston and has been disused as a hospital for many years.
In it’s life it has been a Veterans Hospital, a hospital for patients with psychiatric disorders and a satellite day centre for St Johns.

The grounds are open to the public and is a great dog walking (not dogging) area, with it’s mixture of empty roads, open spaces and trees. The buildings are in severe disrepair,  and all except the church have been bricked up to prevent entry (risk of collapse and asbestos).

Further information on the site can be found here.

Bangour Site
Over view (some) of the site, showing the boiler house (chimney to the centre) and the church (top right).

The general Public have to leave the site by sun down, and if any linger, the on-site security team have no problem in kicking them off …

Except for two nights only, Simon and I were granted unprecedented night-time access to the site, to lightpaint some of the buildings.

Bangour Night

The weather was absolutely horrendous; it threw it down with good old Scottish liquid sunshine – even when it got dark.
The result – unfortunately was the majority of images shot were ruined by water on the lens. Due to the size of the buildings, the average exposure time was around the 5 minutes mark, and that’s more that enough time for the lens to be totally covered in rain and the image damaged beyond my Photoshop skills.

Night Wing
Before the rain really came down, I was able to shoot this
Bangour Church
After thoroughly drying our kit, we moved across the site to the church. The rain stopped just long enough to shoot this, however the low-lying rain clouds mean that the sky is just a mass of orange glow from the reflected street lights of Livingston and Edinburgh

Shortly after we shot the church, the rain re-started with vengeance, and there was little point in continuing.

I would like to thank the people  that granted permission to Simon and I to gain access at night, and to the security team who thought we were made, but understood what we were doing.

It would be fantastic if we got the chance to go back one night – however that’s in the lap of the gods.

The site is in the process of being sold off, with a view to convert it in to a housing estate. The Grade A listed buildings will stay – the church, community hall and the nurses block – however the rest will be demolished if the sale goes ahead. It will be a shame, as the area is well loved among the local community, however seeing the site how it is, is also a shame.

2014 – September – Dunaskin

Ok … lets get this out of the way.
Dunaskin is a place.
Its not me trying to be clever, you know, in a kind of ‘Dunroaming’ kind of way.

There is a private railway society that operates there, and Simon and I being Simon and I, we went when they weren’t there … and had a bloody good day.

All of the photos were taken on a private railway line that was not in use at the time. It is an offence in the UK to trespass on the Railway, and I do not encourage anyone to take photos on an active railway line. They are bloody dangerous places, and trains are surprisingly quiet when they are coming towards you.